The world of environmental safety continues to expand with every passing day. Whether new legislation is being introduced or manufacturers are raising the bar with their products, some part of environmental safety is always in flux. 


As a result, we must all rely on our peers, suppliers, subcontractors and partners to help support our knowledge and inform our decisions. Today, we attempt to shed a bit of light on our chosen forte, namely mask fit testing.


What is Mask Fit Testing?

Mask fit testing refers to the process of certifying or clearing an individual to wear a respirator. Many different respirators can be tested, including half and full-face respirators. After successfully completing the test, employers will receive documentation that states the testing occurred and how successful it was. Additionally, the employee who underwent the test will know the proper way to wear the mask to prevent harm from breathing toxic or dangerous materials.

mask-fit-testing

What Do the Results of Mask Fit Testing Indicate?

The results from mask fit testing come in two distinct forms, namely qualitative and quantitative.


Qualitative Testing

A qualitative test determines a general “pass-fail” scenario. Usually, these tests rely on an individual’s ability to taste a sprayable solution. If they detect the odour or taste, they have not achieved a secure fit.


Quantitative Testing

machine. This state-of-the-art equipment allows the control of negative pressure inside the mask. Further, to keep the pressure constant, it must pull out any additional air leaking into the respirator. The measurement indicates how much air leaks into the respirator, which is converted into a fit factor.


Quantitative fit testing is considered the gold standard for testing as it provides information about how well the respirator actually fits. Unlike qualitative testing, which only offers a yes or no, quantitative results measure the effectiveness of the facial seal. This can help identify sizing issues as well as prevent subjective results.


Find the Right Test for You Today

Whether your employees need quantitative or qualitative mask fit testing, the first call you need to make is Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing. We come to you, so don’t delay; call today!


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

The world of safety in Alberta is constantly evolving and changing. It seems like just yesterday there were protests and public outrage when new farming legislation came into law. And, with yearly reviews, exemptions and changes, there is always something new to discover within the industry.


However, even within the existing act, regulations and code, there is a fair amount to learn and understand. It is essential for both employers and employees to study and keep abreast of these changes, as they may affect work sites, policies, and procedures. Today, we will look at just one part of the Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) Code, namely schedule 3.


What is Schedule 3 in OHS Code?

Like all schedules in the OHS Code, Schedule 3 is at the very back of the blue book. It refers to three tables that all relate to noise within the workplace. Below, we will focus on Table 1: Occupational exposure limits for noise. For reference sake, however, it is worth noting that Table 2 provides guidance on the selection of hearing protection devices, and Table 3 describes permissible background noise conditions during audiometric testing.


How to Interpret Schedule 3, Table 1

Interpreting the first table in this schedule is key to understanding the building blocks of your hearing conservation program. It simply contrasts the decibel exposure level (dBA) with the maximum allowable exposure duration. As an example, at 82 dBA a worker can face exposure for up to 16 hours without permanent hearing damage. This is considered the Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) for that noise level.


However, this steeply drops off as at 85 dBA the OEL is reduced to half that amount or just 8 hours. Additionally, it is relevant to note the requirements for hearing protection and a hearing conservation program over the 85 dBA mark. Once the noise levels reach 115 dBA or greater, there is no amount of worker exposure allowed.

hearing-conservation-program


How to Find the Right Hearing Protection

Once you have tested your worksite and determined what level of noise is present, the next step will be protecting your workers. This may involve changing processes, replacing equipment, introducing new policies or updating personal protective equipment requirements.


For help understanding employer’s responsibility to workers, effective and fast testing or other relevant concerns, contact us today!


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

There are many essential components to a company’s health and safety program. Emergency procedures, personal protective equipment requirements, formal and informal hazard assessments and many more make the entire process seem overwhelmingly. In fact, most employers hire safety representatives and personnel just to ensure there is a person reviewing and revising the program regularly. Mask fit testing is just one component of a complete approach to employer and employee safety. 


The masks that require fit testing are a part of a company’s respiratory equipment policy. If workers are exposed to dangerous gases or airborne materials, this policy becomes a legislative requirement by the provincial Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) Code. 

So, how does mask fit testing work?


How Mask Fit Testing Works

Qualitative vs Quantitative

It is important to note that there are two different fit tests: Qualitative and Quantitative.

A quantitative test measures the amount of leakage from a respirator by using a quantifit machine. This state-of-the-art equipment allows the control of negative pressure inside the mask. Further, to keep the pressure constant it must pull out any additional air leaking into the respirator. The measurement indicates how much air leaks into the respirator, and this is converted into a fit factor.


On the other side, a qualitative test is meant to determine a general “pass-fail” scenario. Usually, these tests rely on an individual’s ability to smell or taste a sprayable solution. If they detect the odour or taste, they have not achieved a secure fit.


Why Is Mask Fit Testing Important?

Getting both tests conducted is necessary for the safety of employees, as is selecting the right type of respirator for the hazards at the workplace. Particulate size, supplied air and volatility are all important variables that must be considered during the equipment selection process. For the best results, consultation with exposed employees is strongly recommended. 


Furthermore, Worksafe Alberta determines that employers must adhere to the Alberta OH&S Guidelines for fit testing if employees are working in areas where they are exposed to airborne hazards. Employers must conduct mask fit testing when: 

  • The employee is first issued a respirator and then at least every two years after
  • The respirator mask changes
  • The conditions at the workplace change
  • The worker has suffered facial features that might change the tightness of the respirator


Ensuring the safety of workers is a cooperative responsibility of everyone present on the worksite, and understanding the legislative requirements of employers, employees and subcontractors is essential in reducing workplace injuries and fatalities. Make sure you are doing your part with the help of Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Your hearing is an important asset. Once it is lost or damaged, there is very little you can do to get it back. This is why hearing loss prevention, through PPE, administrative and engineered controls, is so vital. 

To ensure your safety, it is important to learn about the decibel level protection guidelines and schedule an audiometry test.


Why It is Important to Get an Audiometry Test

audiometry-test

The Recommended Threshold for Hearing Protection is 85dBA Lex

Specific industries are prone to loud noises. Just think about working in a factory or on a tarmac at an airport. Employees at welding shops or construction sites are particularly vulnerable to hearing loss. This is why experts have taken the time to measure when this damage occurs. By knowing when damage occurs, it is possible to set necessary safeguards on the working conditions. 

According to experts, hearing protection should always be worn when the sound level reaches 85dBA Lex. If the sound exceeds 85dBA Lex, and you are exposed for longer than the Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL), you may be at risk of noise-induced hearing loss. 

For effective prevention, invest in quality custom ear protection and monitor changes to your hearing with regular audiometric testing.


How to Measure Detrimental Decibel Levels – Noise Measurement & Hearing Loss

Measure the Loudness by Undertaking a Noise Measurement Assessment 

While your employer should be responsible for determining the noise levels in a busy work environment, it is not a process you should leave to chance. 

If you do not have access to sound level meters or noise dosimeters to measure the levels, you should know that we provide noise measurement services that include sound mapping and noise dosimetry.  

These services aim to determine the noise levels in your workplace and occupational exposure of your employees, thereby providing you with an opportunity to implement a hearing conservation program that includes routine audiometric testing and custom ear protection


Watch for Other Signs of Hearing Damage

Another way to make sure that you are staying safe is to track the signs of hearing loss over time. Audiometric testing is the best way to record lasting changes, but pay attention to ringing in the ears, difficulty hearing conversations and other subtle indicators.  

Additionally, you may experience temporary hearing loss in loud situations. Remember, any time you hear ringing in your ears or have to shout to be heard, you should perform a hazard assessment and wear proper hearing protection if there are signs that the environment is too loud.

You should not let these symptoms go unchecked. If you notice any issues with your hearing, start wearing protective gear right away. 

The OH&S code requires employers to have their employee’s hearing checked with an audiometry test if they are exposed to noise regularly. This test can help you determine the state of your hearing.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Many steps go into building your company’s hearing conservation program. Below, we have given a brief overview of each step and how to approach them. For more information, consider reading this post from Work Safe Alberta that outlines the requirements in more detail.


The Steps to Building a Hearing Conservation Program

hearing-conservation-program

Educating Workers

The first step in your hearing conservation program is educating your workers. As an employer, you must ensure that your employees understand the dangers of excessive noise exposure, how to tell they are being exposed to loud noises, and what they can do to protect themselves from hearing loss. 


Measuring Sound Levels

Next, you must measure the sound levels in your workplace. To do this, a suitable individual, with sufficient training, must go through all worksites on your property and assess the level of noise. This involves using a properly calibrated, sufficiently sensitive audiometer per the requirements of CSA Standard Z107.56-06 Procedures for the Measurement of Occupational Noise Exposure. Typically, you begin with the areas where you must raise your voice to be heard and understood.


Posting Signage

After you identify the areas that require hearing protection, you must post signage declaring them as such. This signage must be placed at all entrances to the loud areas, as is suitably possible. 


Controlling Noise Exposure

Once you post signage for all employees and contractors, the next step is controlling the noise exposure of workers who must work in these loud locations. In some cases, this means limiting their time in the area, but it can also mean looking for quieter equipment or making hearing protection available.


Conducting Audiometric Tests

To track the level of hearing loss (If any) of your workers, you must conduct annual audiometric testing for all exposed workers. You must do this testing with trained, qualified and suitable testing equipment and technicians. The best hearing conservation programs hire outside audiometry testing companies to perform this task.


Making Hearing Protection Available

Finally, you are almost ready to work in the loudest areas of your premises again. However, before that, you must find and make available hearing protection that effectively diminishes the worker’s exposure. This may take the form of muffs, plugs or even custom hearing protection. 


Reviewing the Program Annually/ Monitoring Sound Levels

Now that you have a hearing conservation program that meets the standards and requirements of Alberta Occupational Health & Safety, there is only one step left. An annual review of said program. This is your opportunity to analyze and change any parts of your program that are ineffective. Remember, if your processes change, you must also reevaluate all affected policies and procedures.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

One of the most effective ways to measure your hearing capacity is an audiogram. The audiogram is a results sheet put to use for “pure tone” hearing tests. They effectively indicate your range of hearing, from deep and quiet sounds to high, loud noises. Below, you can learn about the process of taking the test, reading the audiogram and possible indications of your results.


Additionally, we will give recommendations on how to combat hearing loss in your workplace. Among other options, custom earplugs can prove to be an asset for long-term dynamic hearing.


How We Use Audiograms


The Pure Tone Hearing Test

We typically perform hearing tests in one of our mobile vehicles for convenience. Inside, we have soundproof testing booths that meet local and provincial testing requirements, including CSA standards. We measure your hearing in both ears through a series of tones that rise in loudness for particular frequencies across a part of the sound spectrum.


When you arrive, you will don a set of headphones and hold a small button. Then, the tones will begin, and when you first hear the sound, you indicate it with the signal. The test records your input, and this process repeats until the completion of the test. Afterwards, we share the results with you and offer any insights we may have to share.


custom-earplugs

How to Read an Audiogram

The first step in reading an audiogram is to understand the two measures of assessment. The first is pitches and frequencies, which we measure in Hz (Hertz). You read this from a deep tone (250 Hz) on the left to a high tone (8000 Hz) on the right. 


The second metric is loudness or intensity, which goes from quietest at the bottom and loudest at the top, and decibels (dB) are the unit of measurement. Typically, the audiogram has a range of 0dB (quiet) to 100 dB (loud).


Therefore, each mark on the audiogram indicates the lowest intensity threshold for multiple frequencies that each ear hears. Usually, we mark the right ear results with an “O” and the left ear with an “X.”


Interpreting the Results

Generally, hearing loss results from continuous exposure to loud noises or a single loud incident at close range. If we find results on your audiogram where you indicated hearing a particular frequency above a certain threshold, it is typically a sign of hearing loss. 


However, ears will often have different frequency thresholds due to previous overexposure, and poor results in one ear might not show up in the other. As a result, when we share your test results, we may advise you to seek a medical professional for hearing-related concerns.


Custom Ear Plugs and Other Hearing Protection

If you work with loud noises regularly, you should have hearing protection. Although custom earplugs are the most effective method, disposable earplugs and reusable muffs are still better than leaving your ears without protection. All of this protective equipment reduces the intensity of sound and keep the sensitive inner ear safe from long-term damage. Work with your employer to find a solution that works to keep them protected and their workers safe.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

There are many good and responsible reasons for an employer to provide audiometry testing for their workers. One of the best reasons is the legislative requirement set out by Alberta Occupational Health & Safety (OHS). Still, there are also moral and even cost-saving reasons to engage with this valuable service.


However, we still occasionally field questions about why audiometry testing is important and ways to avoid doing it. As a result, we put together a shortlist of the hidden costs of audiometry testing.

4 Results of Ignoring Audiometry Testing

audiometry-testing

Human Impact

Perhaps one of the most obvious hidden costs of employers shirking their audiometry testing is the human impact. Noise exposure is a cumulative effect, which means that the longer an individual works in an area with detrimental noise levels, the more their hearing will suffer. As a result, long term employees may suffer hearing loss prematurely. 


Although this does show a lack of responsibility on the employer’s part, it can also lead to financial penalties if negligence can be proved. Did you know that offences related to safety violations are the only offences in Canada where offenders are guilty until they prove their innocence?


Legislative Fines

One of the biggest hidden costs of audiometry testing is the potential for heavy administrative fines from OH&S. Although there is a relatively small precedent for awarding large fines, employers need to remember what they may be on the hook for. Indeed, for a first-time offence, the fine is up to $500,000! With potential increases to the fine amount of up to $30,000 per day for continuing the offence, these fines carry a hefty burden.


Cumulative Problems

There are also cumulative costs to consider when employers ignore the importance of audiometric tests. In this way, starting late can lead to significant grandfather costs. A good example would be a compressor room built without considering potential noise exposure. Implementing noise reduction materials or controls at a later date may cause significant downtime for staff and operations.


Larger Startup Costs

In a similar vein to the cumulative problems that affect worksites where noise exposure is not reduced, larger startup costs also play a role. Again, we can use our earlier example of a compressor room that needs modification. If the sound levels cannot be reduced around the worksite, it might be necessary to replace the compressor unit with a quieter version. Alternatively, it might be necessary to move the worksite away from the compressor to reduce workers’ exposure. Considering that these only refer to engineered controls, and not the administrative and PPE requirements, it is easy to imagine how these changes could quickly get out of hand.


To learn more about employer responsibilities in Alberta, consider the OH&S Safety Code. This resource provides information and guidance about all employer responsibilities to their worksite, employees, contractors and themselves. For fines, penalties and legal information, the OH&S Safety Act is the perfect resource.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Custom-molded earplugs are a recent innovation that has far-reaching benefits. For instance, when you use them in conjunction with audiometry tests, they can provide substantial protection for your hearing that pays off in the long term. Today we will look at the basics of custom-molded earplugs, such as where to get them, how to store them, and, of course, how to clean them. 


The Basics of Custom-Molded Ear Plugs


How to Find Your Custom Ear Protection

The first step in finding your custom earplugs is to make sure you do your research. We offer a selection of high-quality custom earplugs that work great for busy job sites, but you should be wary of inferior imitators. One of the most effective ways of ensuring the earplugs you purchase are of sufficient quality is to inquire about their noise reduction rating. 

Typically, with hearing protection, you need to divide the rating in half so that you can ascertain the number of decibels reduced by the hearing protection. However, the benefit of custom earplugs is that this is not necessary.


How to Store Your Ear Protection

A lot of people overlook the importance of proper protective equipment storage, but it is an essential part of caring for your equipment. Ears are a delicate part of the body, and putting dirty or contaminated material in them can cause infection or hearing problems. Therefore, you should store them in their accompanying pouch at all times when they are not in use. 

Pair of Purple Earplugs


How to Clean Your Custom Ear Plugs

Cleaning your earplugs is a relatively simple process. You should begin with a gentle solution of soap and water. Then, use a cloth and gently wipe all surfaces of your earplugs including the connection cord (if applicable). Ensure the use of sufficient pressure for optimal results. Afterwards, you should make sure that you dry them thoroughly so that they do not retain any moisture. 


Custom-Molded Ear Plug Tips


These are the necessary steps to remember for your custom earplug cleaning activities. But, keep in mind a few tips and tricks for the best results. Avoid soaking your earplugs as this can cause unnecessary damage and provides little benefit, and, set a cleaning schedule. Ideally, you should inspect and wash them every 3-6 months and replace them every four years. 


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Audiometry testing is required in Alberta when workers will be exposed to detrimental levels of noise. This goes hand-in-hand with providing adequate and appropriate hearing protection. For an employer to determine whether or not they require hearing protection and audiometric testing, they are required to complete a site survey.


This process involves going to each area that has the potential for high levels of noise and testing the decibel level with calibrated and working equipment. It must also be performed by certified technicians who can interpret the results and prepare a report based on the testing performed. But, once this step is completed, how do they determine appropriate hearing protection?



How Did We End Up with Audiometry Testing?


What is an Occupational Exposure Limit?

An occupational exposure limit (OEL) is a limit set by the Alberta or Federal government to determine the acceptable level of exposure for a worker in a typical shift. These OEL’s exist for all sorts of hazardous materials, including chemicals, airborne contaminants, and noise. During the site testing, described above, the ultimate result is a report stating the amount of exposure, measured in decibels, a worker will receive when working in a noisy area. 

Set of molded red ear plugs with a cord

It is then an employer’s responsibility to select and implement hearing protection that lowers their exposure below the OEL. Employer’s typically complete this task by speaking with their safety equipment providers, but how do the providers know how much the noise is reduced?


What is a Noise Reduction Rating?

A noise reduction rating (NRR) is the measure of hearing protection an individual item will offer. It can be a little strange to measure, but essentially, if you halve the NRR you will have the number of decibels it reduces from the total. For example, earplugs typically have an NRR of 30-40 which means the decibels are reduced by 15-20. 


Proper safety equipment and policies must be put in place to reduce the total amount of decibels a worker is subjected to in an 8-hour shift. 


As an example of this, industrial sandblasting equipment typically operates between 100-120 decibels. A sandblaster who will be exposed to this level of noise will be required to wear well-fitted, disposable earplugs, reducing their exposure to roughly 80-100 decibels. As the OEL for noise in Alberta sits at 88 decibels, this is almost sufficient. But then, they must wear insulated blasting hoods to protect their heads and lungs from the sandblasting dust, which carry their own NRR of 30-40. This further reduces their exposure to 60-80 decibels, and they are now no longer exposed to the detrimental effects of noise. 


Audiometry Testing Ensures Protective Equipment Works

So now that we know how employer’s responsibilities to their workers are determined, why do we need audiometric testing? We need it because it establishes a baseline, and tests workers hearing year over year to ensure their hearing does not worsen, which would be a sign their hearing protection is not adequate.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

There are many different types of respirators, and in the wake of the global pandemic involving COVID-19, it is important to know how each of them works, and what they protect against. For instance, if you are working in an area with oily particulate matter, an n95-designated mask will not protect you. As well, most disposable respirators are not acceptable for work where organic vapours are present, such as H2S exposures in oilfield operations. 


Respirators are specially designed facemasks, that either cover the nose and mouth or the entire face. Each of them has different filtering capabilities, and they are used in many applications to protect human life.


The three most common types of respirators are disposable, reusable, and air-supplied.


Disposable respirators are what most people think of when they think of respirators and are typically made to filter particulate matter. There are several certifications that this type of mask can carry, including n95 and p95. Masks with an n95 designation are not suitable for environments where oily particles are present, whereas p95, and r95, masks are.


Mask Fit Testing is Required For Reusable and Air-Supplied


mask-fit-testing


Reusable face masks are used in many settings as well, including industrial paint application and carpentry. They differ from disposable masks in that they are made with more resistant and higher-quality materials, like nylon straps and soft plastic shells. They often require mask fit testing to make sure the face seal is complete, but that is common with all respirators listed here.


 Furthermore, the filter portion of reusable masks is typically removable which means different filters can be applied for different situations. Commonly, a charcoal filter cartridge is combined with a fabric “pre-filter” to ensure adequate protection from particulate and chemical exposure. Charcoal filters are certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for a variety of uses, including formaldehyde and organic vapour protection.


Finally, air-supplied respirators are expensive but reliable pieces of respiratory equipment. Powered Air Purifying Respirators (PAPR) use a fan to deliver filtered air to the individual which is usually mounted on their waist. Conversely, supplied-air systems are attached to an air compressor, or more commonly, a compressed air bottle. 


These devices limit a persons’ exposure to the utmost by removing the need to gather air from their immediate surroundings. The filtering process is completed before the air enters the line to the individual which means different types of filters are used, compared to reusable respirators. In most circumstances, this type of respirator requires a full-face connection in order to function properly, which means mask fit testing of a quantitative nature will be required.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.