Audiometry testing is a useful way to gauge your hearing capabilities. It is made more effective with multiple tests over a period of time, as this allows you to see any changes in your hearing and address any problems as they arise. Still, when given a line graph with numbers and symbols on it, you may not be able to decipher their meaning without a proper explanation. That is what we offer below. 

audiometric-testing

Defining the X and Y Axis’s of Your Audiometry Test

Typically, the X-axis (horizontal) of your audiometry test will be the frequency of the sound, measured in hertz (Hz). Frequency is the measure of a soundwave’s repetition in a certain time frame. Lower frequencies sound deeper and repeat less often. Higher frequencies sound higher and repeat more often. 


The Y-axis (vertical) of your audiometry test represents the intensity of the sound, expressed in decibels (dB). Intensity is a measure of the soundwave’s energy and acts much like the volume buttons on a television remote. More decibels mean a louder sound, which is easier to perceive.


Defining the Plotted Line of Your Audiometry Test

Audiometry testing assesses your ability to hear a range of frequencies. As you proceed through the test, the intensity of the sound will increase until you indicate you can hear it. Each point on the line is where you indicated you could hear the frequency and the intensity of the sound at that time. 


An adult with no hearing loss will identify all frequencies within 0 to 25 dB, and a child 0 to 15 dB. Results with higher intensities indicate that the individual has experienced some hearing loss, which can be addressed with hearing aids and other methods if needed. 


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today at (403) 399-4775.

When it comes to hearing testing, there are many questions to be answered. For example, “who sets up industrial hearing testing?” Answering this question is relatively straightforward, as it is business representatives, like safety consultants, who set up the appointments. We explain in more detail below.

hearing-testing

Everything You Need to Know About Setting Up Industrial Hearing Testing


Organizing Mobile Hearing Testing Services

The process of setting up industrial hearing testing is fairly simple. A business representative will contact our mobile hearing testing service and inquire about the availability of our services. Next, we decide on a time and location for the hearing testing to take place. When the right date arrives, our testing unit will come on-site, park in a convenient location and check in with the site contact. Where necessary, our team will attend relevant safety training and site orientation before the testing begins.

Other Considerations

Depending on the size of your company, you may want to consider organizing the appointment times for hearing testing. Very large companies may prefer to organize the testing by department (accounting, welding, etc.), name or another method. The process takes 12-15 minutes per person, so it is not advisable to queue outside the testing unit. 


Contact Our Mobile Hearing Testing Service Today!

To book an appointment for hearing testing at your facility, simply Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing a call. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff can answer any questions you may have and book your testing appointment at a time that is convenient for you. 


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Audiometry testing accomplishes several key benefits. It ensures your hearing is maintained, alerts you to any changes or unsafe practices at your worksite, and best of all, keeps you in compliance with Alberta Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S) Code. Usually, it is this last item that really gets people to pay attention. 


And for good reason. The requirements of the Act, Regulations and Code have only become more stringent in recent times. With the addition of administrative penalties, this trend is likely to continue into the future. Interestingly, this affects both employers and employees in almost equal measure.


As an employer, you have an obligation to understand these rules and deploy them appropriately to protect your workers. As a worker, you are responsible for complying with regulations and understanding your role in creating a safe work environment for yourself and your peers. But does this mean that your workplace must complete audiometry testing?



Who Needs Audiometry Testing

Every employer will need to consider audiometry testing, at least to the extent that their workers are exposed to noise in the run of a typical day. They must either reduce the noise to below the Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) threshold, or develop a hearing conservation program that includes audiometric testing. For more information about OELs, check here.


So, if your workplace is a relatively quiet environment without regular spikes in the noise level, you may not have to worry about audiometry testing. Still, many commercial and industrial companies will have at least some level of noise for their manufacturing or processing equipment. But, when does “some noise” become “too much noise”?


For that, we need two pieces of information. The first is Section 218 and the second is Schedule 3, Table 1, referred to in this section. 


Section 218

An employer must ensure that a worker’s exposure to noise does not exceed 

(a) the noise exposure limits in Schedule 3, Table 1, and

 (b) 85 dBA LexB

Schedule 3, Table 1

Exposure Level (dBA)Exposure Duration
8216 hours
8312 hours and 41 minutes
8410 hours and 4 minutes
858 hours
884 hours
912 hours 
941 hours
9730 minutes
10015 minutes
1038 minutes
1064 minutes
1092 minutes
11256 seconds
115 and greater


Basically, if noise goes above these limits at your workplace, it is time to develop a hearing conservation program and perform audiometry testing for your workers.

audiometry-testing

How to Get Audiometry Testing

We offer mobile audiometry testing throughout Western Canada. Our vehicles are equipped with all the equipment necessary to perform the testing and produce reports stating the results. To learn more about how we can help, contact us today.



Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

The world of safety in Alberta is constantly evolving and changing. It seems like just yesterday there were protests and public outrage when new farming legislation came into law. And, with yearly reviews, exemptions and changes, there is always something new to discover within the industry.


However, even within the existing act, regulations and code, there is a fair amount to learn and understand. It is essential for both employers and employees to study and keep abreast of these changes, as they may affect work sites, policies, and procedures. Today, we will look at just one part of the Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) Code, namely schedule 3.


What is Schedule 3 in OHS Code?

Like all schedules in the OHS Code, Schedule 3 is at the very back of the blue book. It refers to three tables that all relate to noise within the workplace. Below, we will focus on Table 1: Occupational exposure limits for noise. For reference sake, however, it is worth noting that Table 2 provides guidance on the selection of hearing protection devices, and Table 3 describes permissible background noise conditions during audiometric testing.


How to Interpret Schedule 3, Table 1

Interpreting the first table in this schedule is key to understanding the building blocks of your hearing conservation program. It simply contrasts the decibel exposure level (dBA) with the maximum allowable exposure duration. As an example, at 82 dBA a worker can face exposure for up to 16 hours without permanent hearing damage. This is considered the Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) for that noise level.


However, this steeply drops off as at 85 dBA the OEL is reduced to half that amount or just 8 hours. Additionally, it is relevant to note the requirements for hearing protection and a hearing conservation program over the 85 dBA mark. Once the noise levels reach 115 dBA or greater, there is no amount of worker exposure allowed.

hearing-conservation-program


How to Find the Right Hearing Protection

Once you have tested your worksite and determined what level of noise is present, the next step will be protecting your workers. This may involve changing processes, replacing equipment, introducing new policies or updating personal protective equipment requirements.


For help understanding employer’s responsibility to workers, effective and fast testing or other relevant concerns, contact us today!


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Your hearing is an important asset. Once it is lost or damaged, there is very little you can do to get it back. This is why hearing loss prevention, through PPE, administrative and engineered controls, is so vital. 

To ensure your safety, it is important to learn about the decibel level protection guidelines and schedule an audiometry test.


Why It is Important to Get an Audiometry Test

audiometry-test

The Recommended Threshold for Hearing Protection is 85dBA Lex

Specific industries are prone to loud noises. Just think about working in a factory or on a tarmac at an airport. Employees at welding shops or construction sites are particularly vulnerable to hearing loss. This is why experts have taken the time to measure when this damage occurs. By knowing when damage occurs, it is possible to set necessary safeguards on the working conditions. 

According to experts, hearing protection should always be worn when the sound level reaches 85dBA Lex. If the sound exceeds 85dBA Lex, and you are exposed for longer than the Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL), you may be at risk of noise-induced hearing loss. 

For effective prevention, invest in quality custom ear protection and monitor changes to your hearing with regular audiometric testing.


How to Measure Detrimental Decibel Levels – Noise Measurement & Hearing Loss

Measure the Loudness by Undertaking a Noise Measurement Assessment 

While your employer should be responsible for determining the noise levels in a busy work environment, it is not a process you should leave to chance. 

If you do not have access to sound level meters or noise dosimeters to measure the levels, you should know that we provide noise measurement services that include sound mapping and noise dosimetry.  

These services aim to determine the noise levels in your workplace and occupational exposure of your employees, thereby providing you with an opportunity to implement a hearing conservation program that includes routine audiometric testing and custom ear protection


Watch for Other Signs of Hearing Damage

Another way to make sure that you are staying safe is to track the signs of hearing loss over time. Audiometric testing is the best way to record lasting changes, but pay attention to ringing in the ears, difficulty hearing conversations and other subtle indicators.  

Additionally, you may experience temporary hearing loss in loud situations. Remember, any time you hear ringing in your ears or have to shout to be heard, you should perform a hazard assessment and wear proper hearing protection if there are signs that the environment is too loud.

You should not let these symptoms go unchecked. If you notice any issues with your hearing, start wearing protective gear right away. 

The OH&S code requires employers to have their employee’s hearing checked with an audiometry test if they are exposed to noise regularly. This test can help you determine the state of your hearing.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

Many steps go into building your company’s hearing conservation program. Below, we have given a brief overview of each step and how to approach them. For more information, consider reading this post from Work Safe Alberta that outlines the requirements in more detail.


The Steps to Building a Hearing Conservation Program

hearing-conservation-program

Educating Workers

The first step in your hearing conservation program is educating your workers. As an employer, you must ensure that your employees understand the dangers of excessive noise exposure, how to tell they are being exposed to loud noises, and what they can do to protect themselves from hearing loss. 


Measuring Sound Levels

Next, you must measure the sound levels in your workplace. To do this, a suitable individual, with sufficient training, must go through all worksites on your property and assess the level of noise. This involves using a properly calibrated, sufficiently sensitive audiometer per the requirements of CSA Standard Z107.56-06 Procedures for the Measurement of Occupational Noise Exposure. Typically, you begin with the areas where you must raise your voice to be heard and understood.


Posting Signage

After you identify the areas that require hearing protection, you must post signage declaring them as such. This signage must be placed at all entrances to the loud areas, as is suitably possible. 


Controlling Noise Exposure

Once you post signage for all employees and contractors, the next step is controlling the noise exposure of workers who must work in these loud locations. In some cases, this means limiting their time in the area, but it can also mean looking for quieter equipment or making hearing protection available.


Conducting Audiometric Tests

To track the level of hearing loss (If any) of your workers, you must conduct annual audiometric testing for all exposed workers. You must do this testing with trained, qualified and suitable testing equipment and technicians. The best hearing conservation programs hire outside audiometry testing companies to perform this task.


Making Hearing Protection Available

Finally, you are almost ready to work in the loudest areas of your premises again. However, before that, you must find and make available hearing protection that effectively diminishes the worker’s exposure. This may take the form of muffs, plugs or even custom hearing protection. 


Reviewing the Program Annually/ Monitoring Sound Levels

Now that you have a hearing conservation program that meets the standards and requirements of Alberta Occupational Health & Safety, there is only one step left. An annual review of said program. This is your opportunity to analyze and change any parts of your program that are ineffective. Remember, if your processes change, you must also reevaluate all affected policies and procedures.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

One of the most effective ways to measure your hearing capacity is an audiogram. The audiogram is a results sheet put to use for “pure tone” hearing tests. They effectively indicate your range of hearing, from deep and quiet sounds to high, loud noises. Below, you can learn about the process of taking the test, reading the audiogram and possible indications of your results.


Additionally, we will give recommendations on how to combat hearing loss in your workplace. Among other options, custom earplugs can prove to be an asset for long-term dynamic hearing.


How We Use Audiograms


The Pure Tone Hearing Test

We typically perform hearing tests in one of our mobile vehicles for convenience. Inside, we have soundproof testing booths that meet local and provincial testing requirements, including CSA standards. We measure your hearing in both ears through a series of tones that rise in loudness for particular frequencies across a part of the sound spectrum.


When you arrive, you will don a set of headphones and hold a small button. Then, the tones will begin, and when you first hear the sound, you indicate it with the signal. The test records your input, and this process repeats until the completion of the test. Afterwards, we share the results with you and offer any insights we may have to share.


custom-earplugs

How to Read an Audiogram

The first step in reading an audiogram is to understand the two measures of assessment. The first is pitches and frequencies, which we measure in Hz (Hertz). You read this from a deep tone (250 Hz) on the left to a high tone (8000 Hz) on the right. 


The second metric is loudness or intensity, which goes from quietest at the bottom and loudest at the top, and decibels (dB) are the unit of measurement. Typically, the audiogram has a range of 0dB (quiet) to 100 dB (loud).


Therefore, each mark on the audiogram indicates the lowest intensity threshold for multiple frequencies that each ear hears. Usually, we mark the right ear results with an “O” and the left ear with an “X.”


Interpreting the Results

Generally, hearing loss results from continuous exposure to loud noises or a single loud incident at close range. If we find results on your audiogram where you indicated hearing a particular frequency above a certain threshold, it is typically a sign of hearing loss. 


However, ears will often have different frequency thresholds due to previous overexposure, and poor results in one ear might not show up in the other. As a result, when we share your test results, we may advise you to seek a medical professional for hearing-related concerns.


Custom Ear Plugs and Other Hearing Protection

If you work with loud noises regularly, you should have hearing protection. Although custom earplugs are the most effective method, disposable earplugs and reusable muffs are still better than leaving your ears without protection. All of this protective equipment reduces the intensity of sound and keep the sensitive inner ear safe from long-term damage. Work with your employer to find a solution that works to keep them protected and their workers safe.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.    

There are many good and responsible reasons for an employer to provide audiometry testing for their workers. One of the best reasons is the legislative requirement set out by Alberta Occupational Health & Safety (OHS). Still, there are also moral and even cost-saving reasons to engage with this valuable service.


However, we still occasionally field questions about why audiometry testing is important and ways to avoid doing it. As a result, we put together a shortlist of the hidden costs of audiometry testing.

4 Results of Ignoring Audiometry Testing

audiometry-testing

Human Impact

Perhaps one of the most obvious hidden costs of employers shirking their audiometry testing is the human impact. Noise exposure is a cumulative effect, which means that the longer an individual works in an area with detrimental noise levels, the more their hearing will suffer. As a result, long term employees may suffer hearing loss prematurely. 


Although this does show a lack of responsibility on the employer’s part, it can also lead to financial penalties if negligence can be proved. Did you know that offences related to safety violations are the only offences in Canada where offenders are guilty until they prove their innocence?


Legislative Fines

One of the biggest hidden costs of audiometry testing is the potential for heavy administrative fines from OH&S. Although there is a relatively small precedent for awarding large fines, employers need to remember what they may be on the hook for. Indeed, for a first-time offence, the fine is up to $500,000! With potential increases to the fine amount of up to $30,000 per day for continuing the offence, these fines carry a hefty burden.


Cumulative Problems

There are also cumulative costs to consider when employers ignore the importance of audiometric tests. In this way, starting late can lead to significant grandfather costs. A good example would be a compressor room built without considering potential noise exposure. Implementing noise reduction materials or controls at a later date may cause significant downtime for staff and operations.


Larger Startup Costs

In a similar vein to the cumulative problems that affect worksites where noise exposure is not reduced, larger startup costs also play a role. Again, we can use our earlier example of a compressor room that needs modification. If the sound levels cannot be reduced around the worksite, it might be necessary to replace the compressor unit with a quieter version. Alternatively, it might be necessary to move the worksite away from the compressor to reduce workers’ exposure. Considering that these only refer to engineered controls, and not the administrative and PPE requirements, it is easy to imagine how these changes could quickly get out of hand.


To learn more about employer responsibilities in Alberta, consider the OH&S Safety Code. This resource provides information and guidance about all employer responsibilities to their worksite, employees, contractors and themselves. For fines, penalties and legal information, the OH&S Safety Act is the perfect resource.


Rocky Mountain Mobile Hearing Testing is your locally owned and operated Calgary business. We are committed to providing mobile hearing testing services and other safety tests, to numerous industries and companies in Western Canada. Our services are part of the WorkSafeBC Provider Network, while our sound booths are approved by the CSA. We offer audiometry testing, mask fit testing, custom earplugs, noise measurements, help with implementing a hearing conservation program, and spirometry testing. If you want to improve your workplace, leave it in the hands of our team. Contact us today on (403) 399-4775.